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Xplore Vienna 2013

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delta®

delta

His Workshops:

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delta® has been an art performer, dancer, choreographer, art director and light & stage artist since the late 70's.

In 1985 he started his autodidactic dance studies by experimenting on stage and specialising in the German “Ausdruckstanz” (expressionist dance). In 1986 he started practicing Butoh, studying with Tetsuro Tamura, Akaji Maro, Kazuo Ohno and Anzu Furukawa in Tokyo.

In 1987 he founded tatoeba-THÉÂTRE DANSE GROTESQUE with Minako Seki and Yumiko Yoshioka in Berlin.

In 1995 he created "eX...it!" an international symposium and dance exchange project. Together with Yumiko Yoshioka he curates and directs this 4-yearly event at the Castle of Bröllin, an art-in-residence centre in Germany.

In 1998 he started exploring interactions with dance.  His “Foot Washing Ceremony” presents an interactive public dance-installation for one person (www.feetwash.de).

Since 2000 he mainly collaborates with Felix Ruckert in Berlin and Gregor Weber in Cologne.

Through Felix he got in touch with Contemporary Dance, participatind in Felix Ruckert's interactive performances including “Deluxe Joy Pilot”, “Ring”, “Love Zoo” and “Secret Service”. He also regularly teaches at xplore.

Since 2004 he has been administrative director of Cie. Felix Ruckert Berlin e.V. and since 2008 administrative director of schwelle7.

As part of the Creation Team of the Xplore he is responsible for all production affairs, especially website, financial affairs, registration and participant's support.

  

  

  

Mental Bondagedelta-mentalBondage

An inner voyage Butoh dance workshop

As my artistic background is based in Butoh dance I want to share an inner voyage approach to improvisation.

In this workshop, we will use the expressive form of Butoh to create absurd and fantastical dialogues in the fields of feeling. By dancing we turn into story-tellers whose bodies create an affair of the in-between, clasped by moments of spirituality.

We will examine these fields of feeling by taking positions and by jumping into emotions. We will also become aware that a little taste of dominance and submission can make us more playful.

Photo: © Peter Banki

  

  

Penitence - Atonement through paindelta-penitence

This workshop highlights the story of misconduct, atonement and breaking rules and the remorse, penance and punishment that follows. Punishment especially has for all of us a painful aspect. Whether it is a punishment of the body or the soul, everything that hurts us can also teach us something when we consciously give into the pain. We all have experience with punishment whether in childhood or as an adult.

For some of us, it is mainly psychological through humiliation or the withdrawal of love, for others it is mainly bodily through all forms of beating and other painful sanctions. Every one of us deals differently with his or her experiences and many of us reproduce their experiences in different forms throughout their whole life. Some compensate by taking the parental role to correct and punish others while some choose to take the child’s role and feel quite well in enduring humiliation and punishment. This behavior is found also in "real life" in love games.

If there is no counterpart demanding penance, many develop instruments of self-punishment such as the withdrawal of food (bulimia, anorexia) to all kinds of psychosomatic disorders including religious-based self-flagellation (Opus Dei). Bringing to consciousness our unconscious mechanisms of punishment and symbolic acting out can have therapeutic effects in helping us deal with traumatic "guilt and atonement" experiences instead of torturing our bodies with diseases.

We will discuss our various personal experiences with breaking rules and punishment in this workshop, and reflect on possible somatic kinds of self-punishment and get to deal with them in the form of punishment scenarios (that are effectively painful) in a playful way.

Photo: © Mélanie Le Grand